Neil Pedersen Presents at State Bar Solo and Small Firm Summit

Adjunct Professor Neil Pedersen gave two one-hour presentations at this year’s State Bar Solo and Small Firm Summit on June 18, 2015, in Newport Beach, California. One presentation was entitled “Time Management for the Busy Attorney,” and the other was entitled “The Paperless Law Office: Using Technology to Maximize Efficiency and Profit.” The State Bar’s California Young Lawyers Association has asked Professor Pedersen to produce two recorded segments on those same topics for its Ten Minute Mentor program, where CYLA members can view ten-minute videos on topics related to the practice of law.

Advertisements

Cheyanna Jaffke Attends U.S. Tax Court Judicial Conference

Professor Cheyanna Jaffke recently returned from the U.S. Tax Court Judicial Conference at Duke University. Attendance at the conference is by invitation only and Professor Jaffke was invited by the Chief Judge of the U.S. Tax Court, Michael Thornton. She had breakfast with Judge Eric G. Bruggink, senior judge on the United States Court of Federal Claims in Washington, DC, met and spoke with Justice Antonin Scalia, and had dinner with Judge Robert A. Wherry, Jr., senior judge of the U.S. Tax Court.

Jennifer Koh’s Article Cited Extensively by United States Supreme Court in Mellouli Decision

The United States Supreme Court cited and quoted Professor Jennifer Koh in its majority opinion in Mellouli v. Lynch, an important case involving the immigration consequences of crime. In Mellouli, the Court held in a 7-2 opinion that a lawful permanent resident’s conviction for possession of drug paraphernalia under Kansas law (in this case, involving four unidentified pills contained in a sock) did not trigger deportation. The majority opinion, written by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, cited and quoted Professor Koh’s law review article, “The Whole Better Than the Sum: A Case for the Categorical Approach to Determining the Immigration Consequences of Crime,” 26 Geo. Immigr. L. J. 257 (2012) extensively to support the contention that the “categorical approach” – a methodology used by adjudicators to determine whether a conviction should trigger adverse immigration consequences — “is suited to the realities of the system.” (Slip op. at 7). Earlier this year, Professor Koh weighed in with her thoughts on the Mellouli case in an online symposium at crimmigration.com.