Jennifer Koh’s Article Cited by Ninth Circuit

Jennifer Koh’s law review article, Crimmigration and the Void for Vagueness Doctrine, published by the Wisconsin law Review in 2016, has been cited by Judge Marsha Berzon of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in a concurring opinion arguing for reconsideration of whether the “crime involving moral turpitude” definition in immigration law is unconstitutionally vague.  The decision in Aguirre-Barbosa v. Barr can be found here.

Jennifer Koh’s Essay on Crimmigration Published in Stanford Law Review’s Immigration Symposium

Professor Jennifer’s Koh’s essay was published by the Stanford Law Review in its online immigration symposium.  “Crimmigation Beyond the Headlines:  The Board of Immigration Appeals’ Quiet Expansion of the Meaning of Moral Turpitude” critically examines the ways that the Board of Immigration Appeals has quietly but significantly expanded the definition of “crimes involving moral turpitude,” thereby enhancing the federal government’s power to detain, deport, and disqualify thousands of noncitizens from immigration relief.

Immigration Clinic Faculty Speak at Southwestern Law Review Symposium

On February 1, Professors Andrew Knapp and Jennifer Koh spoke at a symposium organized by the Southwestern Law Review on “Immigration in the Trump Era.” Both participated in a panel entitled, “Dimaya and the Crimmigration of Migration.”  Professor Knapp shared about his representation of James Dimaya, whose case he took from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to the Supreme Court, and for whom he and the rest of the legal team prevailed in Sessions v. Dimaya (invalidating a portion of the “crime of violence” definition in immigration law under the void for vagueness doctrine).  Professor Koh’s comments focused on the void for vagueness doctrine and immigration enforcement, which arose from her law review article, “Crimmigration and the Void for Vagueness Doctrine,” which appeared in a 2017 issue of the Wisconsin Law Review as well as a forthcoming essay that will soon appear in the Stanford Law Review Online.

Jennifer Koh Trains Colorado-Area Immigration Attorneys 

On October 13, Professor Jennifer Koh spoke on a panel at the American Immigration Lawyers Association’s Rocky Mountain Conference on Crimmigration in Denver, Colorado at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. The panel focused on legal strategies to defend against expedited removal and reinstatement of removal, two forms of removal used by the Department of Homeland Security to deport immigrants without providing immigration court hearings.

Jennifer Koh Speaks at Pepperdine Law Conference on Christianity and Crimmigration

On March 10, 2017, Professor Jennifer Koh presented at the annual Nootbaar Institute Conference at Pepperdine Law School. The theme of this year’s conference was “Religious Critiques of the Law.” Professor Koh spoke on a panel entitled, “Religious Critiques of Civil Rights,” and her presentation focused on the connections between the faith commitments of Christianity and the literature on the intersection of criminal and immigration law, also known as “crimmigration.”