Jennifer Koh Trains Orange County Lawyers in Asylum Law; Deportation Defense and the Immigration Consequences of Crime

On June 5, Professor Jennifer Koh spoke at a joint meeting of the International Law and Immigration Law Sections of the Orange County Bar Association on U.S. asylum and refugee law.  She presented on the topic with Professor Marisa Cianciarulo, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Chapman University’s Dale Fowler School of Law.

 On June 6, Professor Koh conducted a 3-hour training entitled, “Crimmigration Law and Deportation Defense,” which was attended by over 60 immigration lawyers, criminal defense lawyers, community advocates and summer law interns.  Her co-presenters were Annie Lai, Clinical Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Immigrants’ Rights Clinic at UC Irvine School of Law and Monica Glicken, Lead Immigration Attorney at the Public Law Center. The training took place at Western State College of Law, and was co-sponsored by the Western State College of Law Immigration Clinic, UC Irvine School of Law Immigrants’ Rights Clinic, Public Law Center, Orange County Justice Fund, and Orange County Rapid Response Network.

Advertisements

Jennifer Koh Serves as Amicus Counsel in Published Ninth Circuit Decision on Crimes Involving Moral Turpitude

On April 9, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued a published decision involving crimes involving moral turpitude in the immigration context, in a case where Professor Jennifer Koh served as amicus counsel, along with Professor Kari Hong at Boston College Law School, on behalf of law professors and clinicians with expertise in immigration law or experience defending noncitizens in immigration proceedings.  The case, Garcia-Martinez v. Sessions, involved the scope of theft crimes and the immigration law definition of a crime involving moral turpitude, and held that an expanded definition of crimes involving moral turpitude could not retroactively apply to certain theft crimes.  Judge Ferdinand Fernandez wrote the opinion.

Jennifer Koh Moderates Panel at Association of American Law Schools Annual Conference 

On January 6, Professor Jennifer Koh served as a moderator and speaker for a panel taking place at the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Annual Conference in San Diego, California. The panel, entitled “Immigration Adjudication in an Era of Mass Deportation,” was hosted by the AALS Section on Immigration Law, and examined–and critiqued–tools used by the federal government to effectuate policy goals related to mass deportation. Other speakers included Lucas Guttentag (Stanford Law School and Yale Law School), Kevin Johnson (UC Davis School of Law), Jason Cade (University of Georgia School of Law) and Nora Phillips (Al Otro Lado).

Jennifer Koh Publishes on Immigration Court Removal Under Trump

Professor Jennifer Koh has published, “Anticipating Expansion, Committing to Resistance: Removal in the Shadows of Immigration Court under Trump,” in the Ohio Northern Law Review, 43 Ohio N.U. L. Rev. 459 (2017).  This invited symposium essay discusses the early indications of the Trump Administration’s plans to expand what Professor Koh has called the “shadows” of immigration court, referring to mechanisms in which the government deports people with little to no involvement from immigration courts and judges.  It considers the implications of such an expansion for immigrant communities and for advocacy in the immigrants’ rights field, with a focus on the potential for both legal and non-legal interventions. It concludes by calling on lawyers, organizers and allies to consider the explosion of shadow removals in resistance efforts.

Jennifer Koh Co-Authors Amicus Brief to Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on Constitutionality of Immigration Provision

On July 21, Professor Jennifer Koh co-authored an amicus brief on behalf of 35 immigration law professors and clinicians in Garcia-Martinez v. Sessions, No. 16-72940, arguing that the immigration law definition of a “crime involving moral turpitude” is unconstitutionally vague under the void for vagueness doctrine.  The amicus brief drew upon arguments discussed in Professor Koh’s 2016 law review article, Crimmigration and the Void for Vagueness Doctrine, 2016 Wis. L. Rev. 1127. The brief was co-authored by Professor Kari Hong, an Assistant Professor at Boston College Law School.

 

 

Jennifer Koh Participates in Panel on Gender-Based Violence at UC Irvine School of Law

On April 7, Professor Jennifer Koh participated in a panel entitled “Responses to Gender-Based Violence in the Trump Era,” which took place in connection with a conference on the Politicization of Safety sponsored by the UCI Initiative to End Family Violence. Her comments focused on the impact of current immigration enforcement policies on domestic violence in immigrant communities.

Sabrina Rivera Presents on Whittier Law School Immigration Attorney Panel

Staff Attorney Sabrina Rivera served as a panelist at the Immigration Attorney Panel held at Whittier Law School on November 7. The panel discussed careers and networking for law students within Immigration Law. Other participating firms included Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy, LLP; Law Offices of Maciel & Ayala, LLP; Law Office of Noreen Barcena; and My Advocate Group.