Lori Roberts Publishes on Consumer Review Site Bullying

Professor Lori Roberts’ article, “Brawling with the Consumer Review Site Bully,” has been published in the University of Cincinnati Law Review, at 84 U. Cin. 633 (2016). Professor Roberts’ article explores the seedy underbelly of crowd-sourced consumer review sites, examines the relationship between consumer review sites, reviewers, and the businesses being reviewed, and outlines the legal landscape for businesses brawling with the consumer review sites.  The Article proposes a solution that includes enforcement of non-disparagement clauses in consumer contracts while acknowledging the critical importance of free speech and public debate, the policies behind anti-SLAPP laws, and the bad public policy of enabling businesses to offer inferior products and service while secretly tucking non-disparagement clauses into their terms of service.

Andrew Knapp and Jennifer Koh Co-Author Amicus Brief to Ninth Circuit Court Appeals

On November 14, 2016, Professors Andrew Knapp and Jennifer Koh co-authored an amicus brief to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in Szonyi v. Lynch, a case involving the immigration consequences of crime. The amicus brief addresses the application of the doctrines of Chevron deference, constitutional avoidance and void for vagueness to the Board of Immigration Appeals’ interpretation of a “single scheme of criminal misconduct.” The brief was submitted on behalf of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA)’s Amicus Committee.

Professor Knapp is currently counsel to Respondent James Dimaya in Lynch v. Dimaya, a Supreme Court case that will be argued in early 2017 involving whether the definition of “crimes of violence” in the immigration context is unconstitutionally vague. Professor Koh has authored an article, forthcoming in the December 2016 volume of the Wisconsin Law Review, entitled “Crimmigration and the Void for Vagueness Doctrine,” which explores the void for vagueness doctrine in the context of crime-based removal statutes in more depth.

Neil Gotanda Presents at Yale Law School

Professor Neil Gotanda spoke on October 11 at Yale Law School on Korematsu Revisited: “Other Racializations” and the Black White Racial Paradigm.  He was invited by the American Constitution Society, Asian Pacific American Law Students Association, South Asian Law Student Association, OUTLaw, Black Law Student Association and Alliance for Diversity.  The presentation was part of a planned series of Critical Race Theory commentaries on well-known constitutional law cases. 

Sabrina Rivera Presents on Whittier Law School Immigration Attorney Panel

Staff Attorney Sabrina Rivera served as a panelist at the Immigration Attorney Panel held at Whittier Law School on November 7. The panel discussed careers and networking for law students within Immigration Law. Other participating firms included Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy, LLP; Law Offices of Maciel & Ayala, LLP; Law Office of Noreen Barcena; and My Advocate Group.

Jennifer Koh Interviewed for Bloomberg BNA Podcast on Immigration Cases Before Supreme Court This Term

Professor Jennifer Koh was interviewed for Bloomberg BNA’s “Cases and Controversies” podcast. Episode 11 of the podcast, entitled “Immigration Evolution,” focused on two immigration cases before the United States Supreme Court this term–Jennings v. Rodriguez and Lynch v. Morales-Santana–and the implications of those cases for traditional deference that the Court extends to Congress in the area of immigration. Other immigration law scholars featured in the podcast were Jason Cade (University of Georgia), Gabriel Chin (UC Davis), Kevin Johnson (UC Davis), Nancy Morawetz (NYU), and Hiroshi Motomura (UCLA).

 

Eunice Park Publishes on Cultural Competence in AALS Section on Teaching Methods Newsletter

Professor Eunice Park’s article, “Establishing Learning Outcomes Under ABA Standard 302: Cultural Competence,” was published in the Association of American Law Schools Section on Teaching Methods Fall 2016 newsletter.  Professor Park discusses how legal writing courses offer opportunities to raise awareness of the importance of sensitivity to diverse cultural mores, and how to assess students’ cultural competence, in order to prepare students “for competent and ethical participation as a member of the legal profession.”

Paula Manning Presents on Feedback for Student Success at McGeorge

Professor Paula Manning’s presentation, “It’s What You Say AND How You Say It:  Autonomy, Supportive Feedback, Mindset, and Motivation,” was held at McGeorge School of Law on October 18.  In this presentation, Professor Manning discussed how faculty at McGeorge can provide feedback to students in ways that increase motivation, foster a growth mindset, and lead to greater student success.