Jennifer Koh’s Article Cited by Ninth Circuit

Jennifer Koh’s law review article, Crimmigration and the Void for Vagueness Doctrine, published by the Wisconsin law Review in 2016, has been cited by Judge Marsha Berzon of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in a concurring opinion arguing for reconsideration of whether the “crime involving moral turpitude” definition in immigration law is unconstitutionally vague.  The decision in Aguirre-Barbosa v. Barr can be found here.

Advertisements

Eunice Park Publishes in Yale Journal of Law and Technology

Professor Eunice Park’s article, “Objects, Places and Cyber-Spaces Post-Carpenter:  Extending The Third-Party Doctrine Beyond CSLI:  A Consideration of IoT and DNA,” was published by the Yale Journal of Law and Technology.  The Article proposes an extended test for the third-party doctrine in the wake of Carpenter v. United States that balances decisional analysis with technological reality, offering a principled framework to encompass the privacy implications of technologies beyond CSLI, and examining the popular consumer technology of smart devices and private genomic testing services as examples.

 

Jennifer Koh’s Essay on Crimmigration Published in Stanford Law Review’s Immigration Symposium

Professor Jennifer’s Koh’s essay was published by the Stanford Law Review in its online immigration symposium.  “Crimmigation Beyond the Headlines:  The Board of Immigration Appeals’ Quiet Expansion of the Meaning of Moral Turpitude” critically examines the ways that the Board of Immigration Appeals has quietly but significantly expanded the definition of “crimes involving moral turpitude,” thereby enhancing the federal government’s power to detain, deport, and disqualify thousands of noncitizens from immigration relief.

Immigration Clinic Faculty Speak at Southwestern Law Review Symposium

On February 1, Professors Andrew Knapp and Jennifer Koh spoke at a symposium organized by the Southwestern Law Review on “Immigration in the Trump Era.” Both participated in a panel entitled, “Dimaya and the Crimmigration of Migration.”  Professor Knapp shared about his representation of James Dimaya, whose case he took from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to the Supreme Court, and for whom he and the rest of the legal team prevailed in Sessions v. Dimaya (invalidating a portion of the “crime of violence” definition in immigration law under the void for vagueness doctrine).  Professor Koh’s comments focused on the void for vagueness doctrine and immigration enforcement, which arose from her law review article, “Crimmigration and the Void for Vagueness Doctrine,” which appeared in a 2017 issue of the Wisconsin Law Review as well as a forthcoming essay that will soon appear in the Stanford Law Review Online.

Neil Pedersen Presents at WSCL, Chapman Law School

Adjunct Professor Neil Pedersen presented his annual “Hit the Floor Running” at Western State on January 12.  Part of a CLE program organized by Pam Davidson, Professor Pedersen’s program provided guidance for young attorneys on topics such as problem identification and problem solving, the written and spoken word, time management, professional conduct and ethics, and business development.  Professor Pedersen also presented Surviving and Thriving in the Practice of Law at the Orange County Bar Association’s Last Dash MCLE event, held at Chapman Law School the same day.  Much of the content from both presentations came from the curriculum of Professor Pedersen’s Law Practice Management and Technology course co-taught with Adjunct Professor Carolyn Dillinger.

Jennifer Koh Featured on Podcast Hosted by Capital Center for Law & Policy at University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

The CAP-Impact Podcast, a podcast hosted by the Capital Center for Law & Policy at the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law featured an interview with Professor Jennifer Koh in a recent episode.  Entitled “Immigration Law & Reform with Professor Jennifer Koh,” the podcast discusses her “work at the intersection of immigration law and criminal law, her new nonprofit project – the Orange County Justice Fund –and being cited in a Supreme Court ruling by the Notorious RBG.”  The podcast was released on January 17, 2019 and is available on Apple PodcastsiTunesStitcher Radio and most other podcast downloading sites.

Carolyn Dillinger Moderates Panel at SMB TechFest

On October 18, adjunct professor Carolyn Dillinger moderated the law panel, “Safeguard Your Technology & Business” at SMB TechFest at the Business Expo in Anaheim. Professor Dillinger organized the panel, which included WSCL alumnus Karima Gulick, to discuss the correct categorization of independent contractors and employees post Dynamex Operations West Inc. v. Superior Court, and tax implications of 26 U.S. Code ⸹ 1202 small business stock for eligible C corporations planning to grow and sell in at least five years. The audience consisted of about 200 technology company owners and staff, including online viewers.

Panlists.LawPanel.ProfDillinger.KarimaGulick.ErinLeach.JonHuckabay.Shot2.2018.10.18TechFest (1)